AsTrend, ancient carvings enhanced

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AsTrend

AsTrend

A short outline of a new low cost methodology: we present the AsTrend, a new methodology for enhance and depict details of the 3D models. This technique is being revealed as an accurate method to study rock art carvings and inscriptions. We think that this method could be used by everyone as the main study objects are based in low cost photogrammetry on the acquisition of 3D models.

by M. Carrero-Pazos, A. Vázquez-Martínez, B. Vilas-Estévez






New possibilities to enhance

ancient carvings:

the AsTrend


Campo Lameiro (Pontevedra)

Campo Lameiro, Pontevedra,
petroglyph (click to enlarge)


An outline of a new low cost methodology

We present the AsTrend, a new methodology for enhance and depict details of the 3D models. It is based on the extraction of LAS points from a tridimensional model, which are processed with the most common Lidar techniques (Hesse 2010).

The AsTrend (a LAS point methodology that is being proposed here), starts from the work of Hesse (2013) and is based on the combination of several of these techniques (Miller, 1994; Štular, et al., 2012).

San Cibrao chapel, inscription (click to enlarge)

San Cibrao chapel, inscription (click to enlarge)

This technique is being revealed as an accurate method to study rock art carvings and inscriptions like those which are proposed here. We expect to test this technique in other supports like bones, wood, pottery and so on. We also think that this method could be used by everyone as the main study objects are based in low cost photogrammetry on the acquisition of 3D models.


Miguel Carrero-Pazos    miguel.carrero.pazos -at- gmail.com
Alia Vázquez-Martínez    alia249 -at- gmail.com

University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Benito Vilas-Estévez    vieito4 -at- hotmail.com
University of Wales Trinity Saint David, United Kingdom


References

HESSE, R. 2010.  LiDAR-derived Local Relief Models – a new tool for archaeological prospection. Archaeological Prospection 17, 2: 67-72.

HESSE, R., 2013. “200 years of grafitti in a rock shelter in Saxony, Germany”. X years Before Present. Looking at the Past Blog. Unpublished work.

MILLER, G. S. P., 1994, “Efficient algorithms for local and global accessibility shading”, Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, (SIGGRAPH 1994, Orlando), ACM, pp. 319-326.

ŠTULAR, B., KOKALJ, Ž., OŠTIR, K., NUNINGER, L., 2012, “Visualization of LiDAR-derived relief models for detection of archaeological features”, Journal of Archaeological Science, 39 (11), pp. 3354-3360.


2 comments

  1. Johnny says:

    I too believe L.I.D.A.R. technology is going to revolutionize prehistoric rock-art research. I congratulate you (and your team) for being one of the first.
    I study prehistoric rock art, but from an aesthetic perspective. I call my approach, ‘the art behind the petroglyph’. Ironically, my theory is more about studying the landscape rather than the symbols. What I like about your paper is that your final results have an aesthetic element to their final appearance, even though you used a high-tech digital medium to accomplish it. The way I see it, and based on the fundamental concepts and systematic techniques I developed for studying prehistoric landscapes, it’s believe the only time a petroglyph artist could and would’ve worked on the panel was when it appeared in a 3 dimensional state, like your examples. That is why I believe the key to discovering the true purpose behind the symbols will depend on discovering the ultimate ‘single point-of-perspective’ in the field that has passed the test of time by enchanting generations of prehistoric individual into believing they were actually looking at a 3-D image of a representative pareidolic image materializing on their sacred landscape. The trick is, you have to be there at the right time and place to setup this highly sensitive and accurate modern-day scientific artist’s tool.
    Thank you for spending the time.
    Johnny

  2. Johnny says:

    I too believe L.I.D.A.R. technology is going to revolutionize prehistoric rock-art research. I congratulate you (and your team) for being one of the first.
    I study prehistoric rock art, but from an aesthetic perspective. I call my approach, ‘the art behind the petroglyph’. Ironically, my theory is more about studying the landscape rather than the symbols. What I like about your paper is that your final results have an aesthetic element to their final appearance, even though you used a high-tech digital medium to accomplish it. The way I see it, and based on the fundamental concepts and systematic techniques I developed for studying prehistoric landscapes, I believe the only time a petroglyph artist could and would’ve worked on the panel was when it appeared in a 3 dimensional state, like your examples. I believe the key to discovering the true purpose behind the symbols will depend on discovering the ultimate ‘single point-of-perspective’ in the field that has passed the test of time by enchanting generations of prehistoric individual into believing they were actually looking at a 3-D image of a representative pareidolic illusion in their sacred landscape. The trick is, you have to be there at the right time and place to setup this highly sensitive and accurate modern-day scientific artist’s tool.
    Thank you for spending the time and keep up the good work
    Johnny

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