Contextualising the Geoglyph of Huacán, southern Peru

Arequipa in southern Peru is very rich in rock art. This study investigates the relationship between the Majes Rock Art Style and the geoglyphs (not a form of rock art, though) in the area. It proves that several geoglyphs are directly related with the petroglyphs of Toro Muerto and also that they are located on ancient routes to and from the Majes Valley. Arequipa en el sur de Perú es muy rico en arte rupestre. Este estudio investiga la relación entre el Estilo del Arte Rupestre de Majes y los geoglifos (no una forma de arte rupestre) en el área. Demuestra que varios geoglifos están directamente relacionados con los petroglifos de Toro Muerto y también que están ubicados en las rutas antiguas desde y hacia el Valle de Majes.

 

*

Contextualising the Geoglyph of Huacán, southern Peru

 

Maarten van Hoek

 

Spanish Version below – Versión en Español abajo

*

Important commentary – Comentario importante

A week after I posted the Huacán article on TRACCE I noticed that all the links to the source of my drawings did not work anymore. The drawings of my Figures 1, 2, 4 and 9 are all based on photographs and a video published by SV Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Peru) in their Facebook page (accessible to everyone). Also two Facebook-links in the text do no longer work. SV Arqueólogos intentionally removed the photos and the video from their Facebook webpage (for what reason?). Therefore, it is impossible to see the original photos and video anymore. I am sorry for the inconvenience this may cause, but rest assured that my drawings provide a rather accurate picture of the geoglyphs and are appropriately acknowledged.

Una semana después de publicar el artículo de Huacán en TRACCE, noté que todos los enlaces a la fuente de mis dibujos ya no funcionaban. Los dibujos de mis Figuras 1, 2, 4 y 9 están todos basados en fotografías y un video publicado por SV Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Perú) en su página de Facebook (accesible a todos). Además, dos enlaces de Facebook en el texto ya no funcionan. SV Arqueólogos eliminó intencionalmente las fotos y el video de su página web de Facebook (¿por qué razón?). Por lo tanto, ya es imposible ver las fotos y el video originales. Lamento las molestias que esto pueda causar, pero tenga la seguridad de que mis dibujos proporcionan una imagen bastante precisa de los geoglifos y están debidamente reconocidos.

Fortunately there still are many good photos of petroglyphs and geoglyphs accessible in their Facebook page, like the camelid geoglyph: Facebook. Afortunadamente, todavía hay muchas buenas fotos de petroglifos y geoglifos accesibles en su página de Facebook, como el geoglifo de camélidos: Facebook. Also a photo of the Huacán geoglyph is still available at Facebook. También una foto del geoglifo de Huacán todavía está disponible en Facebook.

*

Introduction

Well-known are the enormous geoglyphs of the Nasca, Ingenio and Palpa drainages in southern Peru. Remarkably, in Andean archaeology there often seems to exist a discrepancy between the rock art imagery of a region and the images or patterns in other art expressions. Although several biomorphic images can easily be recognised among the Nasca-Palpa geoglyphs, like the famous “Monkey-Fluteplayer” on the Pampa de Nasca (Van Hoek 2005: 10; 2019), it is remarkable that there is also a notable incongruity between the geoglyph imagery and the images in the rock art of the area; the Paracas-Nasca territory, although some geoglyphs have their petroglyph counterpart. In contrast, further south, in northern Chile, geoglyphs and rock art images are often much more similar, especially when it concerns depictions of camelids.

There is a rock art region that can boast to have the largest collection of rock art in the Andes, but also a modest, largely unknown collection of geoglyphs. This area is found in the west of the Department of Arequipa, southern Peru. In this area especially the rock art site of Toro Muerto (located on the west side of the Majes Valley) – together with Alto de Pitis (on the east side of the valley) – are well-known for housing the biggest collection of petroglyphs in the Andes (tentatively estimated by me to have over 3200 boulders with altogether more than 30.000 petroglyphs).

However, the number of geoglyphs in our Study Area (the area of the drainages of the Río Majes and the Río Sihuas and the Pampa de Majes between those drainages) is surprisingly low. Although not all geoglyphs in this area have yet been discovered (they are often small, inconspicuous and wind-eroded), it is clear that a very small collection of those geoglyphs is definitely related to the rock art imagery of the area, which I have labelled the Majes Rock Art Style (Van Hoek 2018). One of those petroglyph-related geoglyphs is the Geoglyph of Huacán, which was recorded by members of the SV Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Peru). This important geoglyph ensemble is located some 20 km to the ENE of Toro Muerto. The object of this study is to discuss important graphical and geographical links between the rock art site of Toro Muerto and the Geoglyph of Huacán.

Toro Muerto

Toro Muerto in the Majes Valley is well-known for its large array of iconic petroglyphs. Idiosyncratic and almost exclusive to Toro Muerto are the Majes “Dancer”; the “Spitter”; the “Rectangular Bird” (Van Hoek 2018; Jennings, Van Hoek et al. 2019) and the “Feathered Homunculus” (Van Hoek 2021). But also almost exclusive to Toro Muerto are the relatively large, practically inevitably vertically arranged zigzag and/or serpentine petroglyphs that are frequently combined with (often centrally placed) straight grooves – that I have called “Stripes” – and large, superficially manufactured discs or dots (Van Hoek 2003). Especially those impressive zigzags, serpentine grooves and “stripes” are key in this study.

Majes Geoglyphs

In the rather flat area between the Majes drainage and the Sihuas drainage (called the Pampa de Majes) there are also a few geoglyphs, one involving a small anthropomorphic figure, which was for the first time discovered by me in 2012 (Van Hoek 2013 – not revealing its location). In October 2019 Luis Villegas, archaeologist of the SV-Arqueólogos asked me to provide him with the location details of this geoglyph, which I emailed him the same month. It is found in Google Earth at 16°25’59.32″S and at 72°16’57.37″W, but is only faintly visible in Google Earth 2012. In October 2020 SV-Arqueólogos  published a better photo in their Facebook page.

Importantly, immediately south of the geoglyph is a wide band showing numerous parallel tracks of camelid-caravans; one of many ancient tracks criss-crossing the pampas. Therefore there possibly is a relationship between the geoglyph and the caravan tracks. Unfortunately the whole area around the geoglyph is increasingly disturbed and destroyed by modern activities that are creating new plantations on the pampa and the inevitable access roads.

Members of the SV-Arqueólogos recorded some other biomorphic geoglyphs in the area. One involves a group of three anthropomorphic figures (Facebook). Also several geoglyphs of quadrupeds (mainly camelids) have been recorded by them. Another (now lost?) geoglyph “near Santa Isabel de Siguas” depicts an impressive snake-like image of about 110 m in longitude (Linares Málaga 2013 [1981]: Fig. 7). At the geoglyph site of Cosos or Huayrapunko a large snake-like geoglyph attached to a large spiral and several other apparently biomorphic images (snakes, quadrupeds and possibly anthropomorphs) have been recorded by López Hurtado and Maquera Sánchez (2016). On a hillside opposite the spiral Johan Reinhard recorded at least one large bird geoglyph. I am sure there are more examples on the Pampa de Majes still to be disclosed or discovered.

Importantly, at least two sets of geoglyphs (both recorded by SV-Arqueólogos somewhere on the Pampa de Majes) involve zigzag and serpentine grooves (running rather steeply upslope; Figure 1-Right) and a stripe-zigzag-stripe combination (on an almost horizontal surface; Figure 2-Right). It is important to note that both sets of geoglyphs are almost identical to similar petroglyphs at Toro Muerto (Figures 1-Left and 2-Left). This similarity brings me to discuss the Geoglyph of Huacán, which was also recorded by members of SV-Arqueólogos.

Click on any illustration to see the enlargement. Haga clic en cualquier ilustración para ver la ampliación.

Figure 1. Left: Petroglyphs on Boulder TM-Aa-064 at Toro Muerto, Peru. Photograph © by Maarten van Hoek. Right: Geoglyph “somewhere on the Pampas de Majes” Peru. Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on a photograph by SV Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Peru) Facebook.

Figure 2. Left: Petroglyphs on Boulder TM-Bc-013 at Toro Muerto, Peru. Photograph © by Maarten van Hoek. Right: Geoglyph “somewhere on the Pampas de Majes” Peru. Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on a photograph by SV Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Peru) Facebook.

*

The Geoglyph of Huacán

The Geoglyph of Huacán is located on the left (south) bank of the Quebrada de Huacán at an altitude of about 1030 m asl. The site is located about 200 m SW from the edge of the floodplain of the Quebrada de Huacán (at about 1015 m asl) on a roughly triangular alluvial fan of two nameless tributaries that run NW towards the Quebrada de Huacán. The geoglyphs are found on the NW facing slope of a small hillock on this alluvial fan (estimated by me to be about 3 meters high and measuring about 60 m by 45 m). This hillock has a somewhat darker colour than the surrounding fan deposits. When someone would climb the steep slopes to the SE of the geoglyph one would reach the flat area of the Pampa de Majes, at that point (at 1600 m asl) also known as Pampa Alto Huacán (Figure 3).

Figure 3. The location of the Geoglyph of Huacán. Drawings © by Maarten van Hoek, based on Google Earth.

The Geoglyph of Huacán comprises eight elements roughly forming a triangle estimated to be 35 m in height and with a base of about 30 m. One element is clearly anthropomorphic and another clearly zoomorphic. All the others are abstract. Those abstract elements comprise three serpentine grooves (Element 3 possibly being “broken” into two parts) and two very short lines. The large straight line has a short appendage that is connected to a small knob.

Figure 4. Left: Elements of the geoglyph in the geographical context. Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on Google Earth. Right: The seven elements building the Geoglyph of Huacán. Drawing (possibly inaccurate) © by Maarten van Hoek, based on a video produced by SV Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Peru): Facebook.

There are two important aspects regarding this geoglyph. First of all I am of the opinion that all elements together form a unity; perhaps even a message. I would like to propose – very tentatively, though – that the graphical ensemble possibly reflects the geographical location.

The alluvial fan on which the hillock is located, is built by two (now dry) streams. The gully to the east of the hillock (1 in Figure 4-Left) corresponds with Element 1 in the geoglyph (1 in Figure 4-Right), while the bifurcated gully to the west of the hillock (2 and 3 in Figure 4-Left) corresponds with Elements 2 and 3 (2 and 3 in Figure 4-Right). Element 4 may symbolically indicate the road that one should follow (in order to reach the Pampa de Majes?), while the knob (Element 5) may indicate the hillock that serves as a traffic sign. Element 7 indicates the traveller (with the right arm pointing to the hillock?), while Element 6 (most likely a camelid) refers to the caravans of camelids that criss-crossed the area in ancient times.

The second aspect concerns the position of the geoglyphs on the hillock. They are positioned on the NW facing slope of the hillock and because the hillock is about 15 m to 35 m above the floodplain of the Quebrada de Huacán, they must have been clearly visible for travellers coming from the Majes Valley following the Quebrada de Huacán. Moreover, in ancient times the geoglyphs most likely were better visible than today, because they then were freshly made and possibly maintained.

The Geo-Graphical Context

Importantly, the Geoglyph of Huacán is definitely graphically related to the rock art imagery of the Central Majes Valley and to the rock art of Toro Muerto in particular. Not only the serpentine lines and their vertical arrangement are identical to several petroglyphs at Toro Muerto, also the outlined image of the camelid is found repeated at Toro Muerto (and at several other sites of the Majes Style Rock Art). Unfortunately, the layout of the anthropomorphic figure is blurred by wind-erosion (especially the head), but the figure definitely has the pose of the well-known icon of the Majes “dancer”. The head seems to have at least two appendages, but there may have been more (now merged together). Those appendages are characteristic for the Majes “dancer”. If indeed this anthropomorph depicts a Majes “dancer”, it could well be unique. However, parallel arranged geoglyphs of three anthropomorphic figures recorded (somewhere on the Pampa de Majes?) also display the pose of the Majes “dancer” and could as well be related (geoglyphs first published by SV-Arqueólogos on Facebook).

Figure 5. Map of the Study Area with some geoglyph sites (green squares) and rock art sites (orange squares). 1: Geoglyph of Huacán; 2: Alto de Pitis; 3: Toro Muerto; 4: Cabracancha. Yellow frame: Figure 6. Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on Google Earth.

However, Figure 5 shows that there is another geographical aspect that connects the Geoglyph of Huacán with Toro Muerto. It is also important that the Quebrada de Huacán empties its intermittent waters at a point (15.7 km downstream of the Geoglyph of Huacán) east of and directly opposite Toro Muerto (and only a little north of Alto de Pitis). At that point (roughly at 450 m asl) an 8-shaped geoglyph was once recorded by Alvarez Zeballos (n.d.). Unfortunately, this geoglyph – aptly called “el Geoglífo de Ocho” – was destroyed some time before July 2012 (Perú21). Crossing the roughly 4 km wide floodplain of the Rio Majes one arrived at Toro Muerto and from there one could continue the journey using the route via the Quebrada de Pampa Blanca, which leads to the important rock art site of Illomas in the Manga drainage and also to the Nevado Coropuna, the most revered Sacred Mountain of the area (Van Hoek 2020). In my opinion the Geoglyph of Huacán marks an important ancient route from Illomas in the Manga drainage, via Toro Muerto in Majes, continuing east through the Quebrada de Huacán to ultimately reach the Majes Style rock art site of Cabracancha, which is located in the Valley of Huacán, roughly 15 km to the ESE of the Geoglyph of Huacán (in the Quebrada de Huacán) and at the SW end of the Tambo de Cabracancha (Trujillo Vera 2011). Importantly, at Cabracancha several petroglyphs of camelids that are more or less similar to the camelid at the Geoglyph of Huacán have been recorded.

From Cabracancha the route may well have been continued to reach the Sacred Mountain of Ampato. Because of the imagery of the Geoglyph of Huacán it is most likely as old as part of the imagery at Toro Muerto and Cabracancha. The geoglyph may even represent one of the first “traffic signs” marking the route when being explored for the first time. Interestingly, there are at least two other cases where geoglyphs can definitely be linked with the Majes Rock Art Style and simultaneously with ancient routes: Cíceras and Cosos (Figure 6).

Figure 6. Map of the Upper Majes drainage showing some geoglyph sites (orange circles) and rock art sites (yellow circles). Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on Google Earth.

*

Case 1: The Cosos Geoglyphs

The first case concerns the large concentration of geoglyphs just north of the Quebrada de Cosos on a long, irregular hillock, called Huayrapunko by Marko Alfredo López Hurtado and Erik Edson Maquera Sánchez (2016). Sector A of the hillock features two large spirals (marked 1 and 2 in Figure 7), the largest of which (Spiral 1, attached to what looks like a large serpent-neck and -head) measures some 22 m in diameter (Figure 8). Those two spirals are found on relatively horizontal ground surface. On the hillslope marked 3 in Figure 7 is a collection of zoomorphic and one anthropomorphic geoglyphs (inset in Figure 7) that overlook a large number of parallel running caravan tracks at the bottom of the slope. The clearly visible tracks of those camelid caravans only crossed the lower parts of Sector A of this isolated hillock (entrances indicated in Figure 7), but they (just) avoided the geoglyphs.

Figure 7. Map of the Cosos geoglyphs. Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on Google Earth. Inset: The geoglyphs at Locus 3, Sector A. Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on a drawing by López Hurtado and Maquera Sánchez (2016: Fig. 10).

Section B is a much higher part of the hillock and its slopes are literally covered with a large array of geoglyphs. There are at least one large snake, numerous camelids and other quadrupeds, birds and some anthropomorphs; all facing more or less to the SW. All geoglyphs at Cosos are of the Majes Rock Art Style, although the large spirals seem to be unique to Cosos. To the east of the hillock is another hillock (marked C in Figure 7) with some Majes Style geoglyphs.

Figure 8. Some of the Cosos geoglyphs. Photograph © by Johan Reinhard. Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on a drawing by López Hurtado and Maquera Sánchez (2016: Fig. 4).

Unfortunately I never was able to locate one (perhaps two) boulder(s) that has (have) been recorded “somewhere in the Quebrada de Cosos” (marked “?” in Figure 6), both featuring a number of typical Majes Rock Art Style petroglyphs (source). Therefore, except for the style of the Cosos geoglyphs the relationship with “nearby” petroglyphs is uncertain. The closest Majes Style Rock Art site that I know of is found at La Barranca in the Majes Valley (see Figure 6).

*

Case 2: The Geoglyphs of Cíceras

The second case offers even more convincing evidence of the proposed relationship between Majes Style petroglyphs and geoglyphs. In 2009 I downloaded a PDF called “Plan de Despegue Turístico Provincia de Castilla: 2008 – 2018”. In it was the description of a petroglyph site, called “Petroglifos de Cíceras”: “Importante repositorio de petroglifos se encuentra en la ruta a los pastizales de Ciseras, hechos en piedras de tufo volcánico los mas característico son la Cantera, Pulgahuasi y Ciceras. Resalta de entre todas la serpiente de quince metros de longitud toda esta en una piedra. Para llegar a estas es por camino de herradura.” (Condori Pacheco 2008: 31; my emphasis).

In January 2018 I asked Luis Villegas whether he knew this 15 m serpent petroglyph, but he emailed me that he did not know the site, but that he would attempt at locating the site. In May 2020 Luis Villegas emailed me that he had found the site (position marked by the large yellow oval in Figure 9). He not only sent me a fine photo (according to the properties of the photo taken in January 2009) of the boulder with the purported 15 m snake (which seems to superimpose two bird petroglyphs, two quadrupeds and one anthropomorph), but also revealed the exact location in Google Earth by sending a KMZ-file (position marked by the small grey circle in Figure 9). Additionally he mentioned that at Cíceras he recorded about thirty more boulders with petroglyphs and that the site was crossed by an ancient, 20 km long path from Huancarqui in the Majes Valley to Cíceras (which is clearly visible in Figure 9). The serpent boulder – labelled Roca 1 by Luis Villegas – is located only 15 m south and downslope of this ancient path.

Figure 9. Left: Map showing the locations of the Cíceras geoglyphs (A,B and C) and petroglyphs (yellow oval). Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on Google Earth. Right: The two camelid geoglyphs (C). Drawing © by Maarten van Hoek, based on a video by Luis Villegas of SV Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Peru): Facebook.

Of course the path will have been used in both directions. However, I would like to tentatively suggest that perhaps the very first explorers came from Cíceras. Two facts seem to confirm my careful hypothesis. Firstly, the panel (240 m high and 295 m wide) with the purported 15 m serpent petroglyph faces east and is thus clearly visible only for travellers coming from Cíceras. Secondly, and what is more important, is that travellers coming from Cíceras first encountered a large geoglyph (recorded by SV Arqueólogos) on a ridge about 110 m SE of the path and at a somewhat lower level than the path. This linear geoglyph (starting at a point position marked by “A” in Figure 9) consists of a 330 m long linear, yet curved “road” (about 7 m wide) that ends at the ruins of some structures (marked by “D” in Figure 9). I am convinced that this geoglyph represents a symbolic, perhaps ritually used path. This road-geoglyph is best appreciated when coming from Cíceras. Immediately to the right (north) of the linear geoglyph are two large geoglyphs of camelids (position marked by “C” in Figure 9; Figure 9-Right) that are looking at the linear geoglyph. At several spots the physical path also shows numerous traces of tracks made by camelids. It is therefore certain that there is a link between the path and the geoglyphs. The path ends at the village of Huancarqui in the Majes Valley, possibly at a spot where once at least one boulder with Majes Rock Art Style petroglyphs was reported.

Moreover, when continuing west from the camelid geoglyphs along the meandering physical path for about 1700 m one will reach the rock art site of Cíceras, where several boulders have petroglyphs of camelids, some of which are almost identical in style and layout as the camelid-geoglyphs. Among the other images are the petroglyphs of quadrupeds (foxes or dogs), snakes, birds (both frontally and laterally depicted), the occasional anthropomorph and a large solar motif with facial features that look east. Several frontally depicted bird petroglyphs feature a skeletal body pattern, which may be compared with a petroglyph at Culebrillas, a rock art site some 86 km to the ESE (Van Hoek 2016: Fig. 22). One boulder with petroglyphs also displayed some red pictographs (as does the El Cubo Boulder). Finally, it is also important to note that both the biomorphic geoglyphs and the petroglyphs at Cíceras definitely belong to the Majes Rock Art Style.

*

Conclusions

This study definitely confirms that there is a firm relationship between the Majes Style Rock Art and some of the geoglyph complexes in the Study Area. However, it seems that the geoglyphs displaying the Majes Rock Art Style imagery are confined to the area just west of the Majes drainage (Cosos) to the west bank of the Sihuas drainage. The east bank of the Sihuas Valley has – as far as I know – only abstract geoglyphs. However, just west of the Sihuas drainage many circular and some abstract and biomorphic (Majes Style) geoglyphs have been recorded (Yépez Alvarez, Jennings and Berquist 2017; Jennings et al. 2021). Such circular (and other abstract) geoglyphs also occur further east, in the Vítor drainage, but are unknown to me in the Majes drainage.

The three geoglyph complexes discussed in this study (Huacán, Cosos and Cíceras) display the Majes Rock Art Style, but there is a difference. Only at the Geoglyph of Huacán the typical serpentine grooves plus stripe have been recorded. What all three sites have in common is that they all are located on ancient routes across the pampas. What is more, it seems that the geoglyph sites are all orientated in such way that they are visible for travellers coming from one direction only. I tentatively would like to suggest that the Cosos geoglyphs greet the caravaners travelling from Majes to Chuquibamba and/or Illomas, while the Cíceras geoglyphs and Boulder 1 at Cíceras greet the traveller from Cíceras to the Majes Valley. Likewise I suggest that the Huacán geoglyph greets the travellers from Majes to Cabracancha. For that reason I suggest that those three complexes of geoglyphs may even be the first signs of exploring possible routes to and from the Majes Valley.

Another difference between the three geoglyph complexes is – even when they all three display images of one or more camelids – that only the Geoglyph of Huacán features the typical Majes Style serpentine and stipe elements (ignoring for the moment the examples shown in Figures 1 and 2 and other geoglyphs). What unites these three complexes is the presence of one or many camelid images. This most likely confirms the importance of camelid caravans across the area. But the Geoglyph of Huacán is – in my opinion – the only one that may reflect the local topography. However, the broad road element at the Geoglyph of Cíceras may well represent a symbolic or ritual path as it runs upslope and parallel to the ancient path for quite a while. It may thus also reflect the local topography. All three areas need to be scientifically surveyed in order to locate further rock art sites and geoglyphs that may confirm my theories.

*

Acknowledgements

The author would like to thank Luis Villegas, archaeologist of the SV-Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Peru) for kindly sending me an excellent photograph of Boulder 1 at the petroglyph site of Cíceras, as well as for sending me the KMZ-file with the exact Google Earth coordinates of Boulder 1. The author is also grateful for Prof. Johan Reinhard for his kind permission to use and publish his photograph (Figure 8).

Versión en Español

(Traducido con Google Translate – Por Favor, Disculpe los Errores)

 

Contextualizando el Geoglifo de Huacán, sur de Perú

 

Maarten van Hoek

Introducción

Son conocidos los enormes geoglifos de las cuencas de Nasca, Ingenio y Palpa en el sur de Perú. Sorprendentemente, en la arqueología andina a menudo parece existir una discrepancia entre las imágenes del arte rupestre de una región y las imágenes o patrones en otras expresiones artísticas. Aunque varias imágenes biomórficas se pueden reconocer fácilmente entre los geoglifos de Nasca-Palpa, como el famoso “Monkey-Fluteplayer” en la Pampa de Nasca (Van Hoek 2019), es notable que también hay una incongruencia notable entre las imágenes del geoglifo y el imágenes en el arte rupestre de la zona; el territorio Paracas-Nasca, aunque algunos geoglifos tienen su contraparte en petroglifos. En contraste, más al sur, en el norte de Chile, los geoglifos y las imágenes de arte rupestre suelen ser mucho más similares, especialmente cuando se trata de representaciones de camélidos.

Hay una región de arte rupestre que puede presumir de tener la colección más grande de arte rupestre de los Andes, pero también una colección modesta y en gran parte desconocida de geoglifos. Esta zona se encuentra en el occidente del Departamento de Arequipa, sur del Perú. En esta área, especialmente el sitio de arte rupestre de Toro Muerto (ubicado en el lado oeste del Valle de Majes), junto con Alto de Pitis (en el lado este del valle), son bien conocidos por albergar la mayor colección de petroglifos en los Andes (tentativamente estimado por mí que tiene más de 3200 cantos rodados con un total de más de 30.000 petroglifos).

Sin embargo, el número de geoglifos en nuestra Área de Estudio (el área de las cuencas del Río Majes y del Río Sihuas y la Pampa de Majes entre esas cuencas) es sorprendentemente bajo. Aunque todavía no se han descubierto todos los geoglifos en esta área (a menudo son pequeños, discretos y erosionados por el viento), está claro que una colección muy pequeña de esos geoglifos está definitivamente relacionada con las imágenes de arte rupestre de la zona, que tengo etiquetado como el “Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes” (Van Hoek 2018). Uno de esos geoglifos relacionados con petroglifos es el Geoglifo de Huacán, que fue registrado por miembros de SV Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Perú). Este importante conjunto de geoglifos se ubica a unos 20 km al ENE de Toro Muerto. El objeto de este estudio es discutir importantes vínculos gráficos y geográficos entre el sitio de arte rupestre de Toro Muerto y el Geoglifo de Huacán.

Toro Muerto

Toro Muerto en el Valle de Majes es conocido por su gran variedad de petroglifos icónicos. Idiosincrásicos y casi exclusivos de Toro Muerto son los Majes “Dancer”; el “Spitter”; el “Rectangular Bird” (Van Hoek 2018; Jennings, Van Hoek et al. 2019) y el “Feathered Homunculus” (Van Hoek 2021). Pero también casi exclusivos de Toro Muerto son los petroglifos en zigzag y/o serpentinas relativamente grandes, prácticamente inevitablemente dispuestos verticalmente, que con frecuencia se combinan con ranuras rectas (a menudo ubicadas en el centro), que he llamado “Stripes”, y discos grandes, fabricados superficialmente o puntos (Van Hoek 2003). Especialmente esos impresionantes zigzags, surcos serpentinos y “rayas” son clave en este estudio.

Geoglifos de Majes

En el área más bien plana entre la cuenca de Majes y la cuenca de Sihuas (llamada Pampa de Majes) también hay algunos geoglifos, uno que involucra una pequeña figura antropomórfica, que descubrí por primera vez en 2012 (Van Hoek 2013 – sin revelar su ubicación). En octubre de 2019 Luis Villegas, arqueólogo del SV-Arqueólogos me pidió que le proporcionara los detalles de la ubicación de este geoglifo, que le envié por correo electrónico el mismo mes. Se encuentra en Google Earth a 16°25’59.32″S y a 72 °16’57.37″ W, pero es apenas visible en Google Earth 2012. En octubre de 2020 SV-Arqueólogos publicó una foto mejor en su página de Facebook. Es importante destacar que inmediatamente al sur del geoglifo hay una banda ancha que muestra numerosas huellas paralelas de caravanas de camélidos; uno de los muchos caminos antiguos que atraviesan la pampa. Por tanto, posiblemente exista una relación entre el geoglifo y las huellas de las caravanas. Desafortunadamente, toda el área alrededor del geoglifo está cada vez más perturbada y destruida por las actividades modernas que están creando nuevas plantaciones en la pampa y los inevitables caminos de acceso.

Los miembros de los SV-Arqueólogos registraron algunos otros geoglifos biomórficos en el área. Uno involucra a un grupo de tres figuras antropomórficas (Facebook). También han registrado varios geoglifos de cuadrúpedos (principalmente camélidos). Otro geoglifo (¿ahora perdido?) “cerca de Santa Isabel de Siguas” muestra una impresionante imagen en forma de una serpiente de unos 110 m de longitud (Linares Málaga 2013 [1981]: Fig. 7). En el sitio de geoglifos de Cosos o Huayrapunko, López Hurtado y Maquera Sánchez (2016) han registrado un gran geoglifo con forma de una serpiente unido a una gran espiral y varias otras imágenes aparentemente biomórficas (serpientes, cuadrúpedos y posiblemente antropomorfos). En una colina opuesta a la espiral, Johan Reinhard registró al menos un geoglifo de un gran pájaro. Estoy seguro de que hay más ejemplos en la Pampa de Majes aún por revelar o descubrir.

Es importante destacar que al menos dos conjuntos de geoglifos (también registrados por SV-Arqueólogos en algún lugar de la Pampa de Majes) involucran ranuras en zigzag y serpentinas (que corren una pendiente bastante empinada; Figura 1- Derecha) y una combinación de “stripe-zigzag-stripe” (en un plano casi horizontal superficie; Figura 2- Derecha). Es importante notar que ambos conjuntos de geoglifos son casi idénticos a petroglifos similares en Toro Muerto (Figuras 1 y 2-Izquierdas). Esta similitud me lleva a discutir el Geoglifo de Huacán, que también fue registrado por miembros de los SV-Arqueólogos.

El Geoglifo de Huacán

El Geoglifo de Huacán está ubicado en la margen izquierda (sur) de la Quebrada de Huacán a una altitud de aproximadamente 1030 m snm. El sitio está ubicado a unos 200 m SW desde el borde de la llanura aluvial de la Quebrada de Huacán (a aproximadamente 1015 m snm) en un abanico aluvial aproximadamente triangular de dos afluentes sin nombre que corren NO hacia la Quebrada de Huacán. Los geoglifos se encuentran en la ladera orientada al NO de una pequeña colina en este abanico aluvial (estimado por mí en unos 3 metros de altura y unos 60 m por 45 m). Este montículo tiene un color algo más oscuro que los depósitos de abanico circundantes. Cuando alguien subía las empinadas laderas hacia el SE del geoglifo se llegaba a la zona plana de la Pampa de Majes, en ese punto (a 1600 m snm) también conocido como Pampa Alto Huacán (Figura 3).

El Geoglifo de Huacán consta de ocho elementos que forman aproximadamente un triángulo que se estima en 35 m de altura y con una base de unos 30 m. Un elemento es claramente antropomórfico y otro claramente zoomorfo. Todos los demás son abstractos. Esos elementos abstractos comprenden tres surcos serpenteantes (uno interrumpido) y dos líneas muy cortas. La línea recta grande tiene un apéndice corto que está conectado a una pequeña perilla.

Hay dos aspectos importantes con respecto a este geoglifo. En primer lugar, soy de la opinión de que todos los elementos juntos forman una unidad; quizás incluso un mensaje. Me gustaría proponer, aunque muy tentativamente, que el conjunto gráfico posiblemente refleje la ubicación geográfica. El abanico aluvial sobre el que se ubica el montículo, está construido por dos quebradas (ahora secos). El quebradas al este del montículo (1 en la Figura 4-Izquierda) corresponde con el Elemento 1 en el geoglifo (1 en la Figura 4-Derecha), mientras que el barranco bifurcado al oeste del montículo (2 y 3 en la Figura 4-Izquierda) corresponde con los Elementos 2 y 3 (2 y 3 en la Figura 4-Derecha). El Elemento 4 puede indicar simbólicamente el camino que se debe seguir (¿para llegar a la Pampa de Majes?), mientras que la perilla (Elemento 5) puede indicar el montículo que sirve como señal de tráfico. El elemento 7 indica al viajero (¿con el brazo derecho apuntando al montículo?), mientras que el Elemento 6 (probablemente un camélido) se refiere a las caravanas de camélidos que atravesaban la zona en la antigüedad.

El segundo aspecto se refiere a la posición de los geoglifos en el montículo. Se ubican en la ladera del montículo orientado al NO y debido a que el montículo se encuentra entre 15 m a 35 m por encima de la llanura aluvial de la Quebrada de Huacán, deben haber sido claramente visibles para los viajeros que venían del Valle de Majes siguiendo la Quebrada de Huacán. Además, en la antigüedad, lo más probable es que los geoglifos fueran más visibles que en la actualidad, porque entonces estaban recién hechos y posiblemente mantenidos.

El contexto Geo- Gráfico

Es importante destacar que el Geoglifo de Huacán está definitivamente relacionado gráficamente con las imágenes del arte rupestre del Valle Central de Majes y con el arte rupestre de Toro Muerto en particular. No solo las líneas serpentinas y su disposición vertical son idénticas a varios petroglifos en Toro Muerto, también la imagen delineada del camélido se encuentra repetida en Toro Muerto (y en varios otros sitios del Es importante destacar que el Geoglifo de Huacán está definitivamente relacionado gráficamente con las imágenes del arte rupestre del Valle Central de Majes y con el arte rupestre de Toro Muerto en particular. No solo las líneas serpentinas y su disposición vertical son idénticas a varios petroglifos en Toro Muerto, también la imagen delineada del camélido se encuentra repetida en Toro Muerto (y en varios otros sitios del Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes). Desafortunadamente, la disposición de la figura antropomórfica se ve borrosa por la erosión del viento (especialmente la cabeza), pero la figura definitivamente tiene la pose del conocido ícono de la “bailarina” de Majes. La cabeza parece tener al menos dos apéndices, pero puede haber más (ahora fusionados). Esos apéndices son característicos del “bailarín” de Majes. Si de hecho este antropomorfo representa a un “bailarín” de Majes, bien podría ser único. Sin embargo, geoglifos dispuestos en paralelo de tres figuras antropomórficas registradas (¿en algún lugar de la Pampa de Majes?) También muestran la pose del “bailarín” de Majes y también podrían estar relacionados (geoglifos publicados por primera vez por SV-Arqueólogos en Facebook).). Desafortunadamente, la disposición de la figura antropomórfica se ve borrosa por la erosión del viento (especialmente la cabeza), pero la figura definitivamente tiene la pose del conocido ícono del “Bailarin” de Majes. La cabeza parece tener al menos dos apéndices, pero puede haber más (ahora fusionados). Esos apéndices son característicos del “Bailarín” de Majes. Si de hecho este antropomorfo representa a un “Bailarín” de Majes, bien podría ser único. Sin embargo, geoglifos dispuestos en paralelo de tres figuras antropomórficas registradas (¿en algún lugar de la Pampa de Majes?) también muestran la pose del “bailarín” de Majes y también podrían estar relacionados (geoglifos publicados por primera vez por SV-Arqueólogos en Facebook).

Sin embargo, la Figura 5 muestra que existe otro aspecto geográfico que conecta el Geoglifo de Huacán con Toro Muerto. También es importante que la Quebrada de Huacán vacíe sus aguas intermitentes en un punto (15,7 km aguas abajo del Geoglifo de Huacán) al este y directamente enfrente de Toro Muerto (y solo un poco al norte de Alto de Pitis). En ese punto (aproximadamente a 450 m snm), Álvarez Zeballos (s.f.) registró una vez un geoglifo en forma de 8. Desafortunadamente, este geoglifo – acertadamente llamado “el Geoglífo de Ocho” – fue destruido algún tiempo antes de julio de 2012 (Perú21). Cruzando la llanura aluvial de aproximadamente 4 km de ancho del Río Majes se llegó a Toro Muerto y desde allí se puede continuar el viaje utilizando la ruta a través de la Quebrada de Pampa Blanca, que conduce al importante sitio de arte rupestre de Illomas en la cuenca de Manga y también al Nevado Coropuna; la Montaña Sagrada más venerada de la zona (Van Hoek 2020). En mi opinión, el Geoglifo de Huacán marca una importante ruta antigua desde Illomas en la cuenca de Manga, pasando por Toro Muerto en Majes, continuando hacia el este a través de la Quebrada de Huacán para finalmente llegar al sitio de Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes de Cabracancha, que se encuentra en el Valle de Huacán, aproximadamente a 15 km al ESE del Geoglifo de Huacán (en la Quebrada de Huacán) y en el extremo SO del Tambo de Cabracancha (Trujillo Vera 2011). Es importante destacar que en Cabracancha se han registrado varios petroglifos de camélidos que son más o menos similares al camélido del Geoglifo del Huacán.

Desde Cabracancha es posible que se haya continuado la ruta hasta llegar a la Montaña Sagrada de Ampato. Debido a las imágenes del geoglifo de Huacán, es muy probable que sea tan antiguo como parte de las imágenes de Toro Muerto y Cabracancha. El geoglifo puede incluso representar una de las primeras “señales de tráfico” que marcan la ruta cuando se explora por la primera vez. Curiosamente, hay al menos otros dos casos en los que los geoglifos definitivamente pueden vincularse con el Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes y simultáneamente con rutas antiguas: Cíceras y Cosos (Figura 6).

Caso 1: Los Geoglifos de Cosos

El primer caso se refiere a la gran concentración de geoglifos al norte de la Quebrada de Cosos en una loma larga e irregular, llamada Huayrapunko por Marko Alfredo López Hurtado y Erik Edson Maquera Sánchez (2016). El Sector A del montículo presenta dos grandes espirales (marcadas con 1 y 2 en la Figura 7), la mayor de las cuales (Espiral 1, unida a lo que parece un gran cuello y cabeza de una serpiente) mide unos 22 m de diámetro (Figura 8). Esas dos espirales se encuentran en una superficie de suelo relativamente horizontal. En la ladera marcada con el número 3 en la Figura 7 hay una colección de geoglifos zoomorfos y uno antropomórfico (inserto en la Figura 7) que dan a un gran número de pistas de caravanas que corren paralelas al pie de la ladera. Las huellas claramente visibles de esas caravanas de camélidos solo cruzaron las partes bajas del Sector A de este montículo aislado (entradas indicadas en la Figura 7), pero (apenas) evitaron los geoglifos.

El Sector B es una parte más alta del montículo y sus laderas están literalmente cubiertas con una gran variedad de geoglifos. Hay al menos una serpiente grande, numerosos camélidos y otros cuadrúpedos, aves y algunos antropomorfos; todos orientados más o menos al SO. Todos los geoglifos de Cosos son del Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes, aunque las grandes espirales parecen ser exclusivas de Cosos. Al este del montículo hay otro montículo (marcado con una C en la Figura 7) con algunos geoglifos del Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes.

Desafortunadamente, nunca pude ubicar una (quizás dos) rocas que hayan sido grabadas “en algún lugar de la Quebrada de Cosos” (marcadas con “?” en la Figura 6), ambas con una serie de arte rupestre típico del Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes (fuente). Por lo tanto, a excepción del estilo de los geoglifos de Cosos, la relación con los petroglifos “cercanos” es incierta. El sitio del Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes más cercano que conozco se encuentra en La Barranca en el Valle de Majes (ver Figura 6).

Caso 2: Los Geoglifos de Cíceras

El segundo caso ofrece una evidencia aún más convincente de la relación propuesta entre los petroglifos y los geoglifos del Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes. En 2009 descargué un PDF llamado “Plan de Despegue Turístico Provincia de Castilla: 2008 – 2018”. En él estaba la descripción de un sitio de petroglifos, llamado “Petroglifos de Cíceras”: “Importante repositorio de petroglifos se encuentra en la ruta a los pastizales de Ciseras, hechos en piedras de tufo volcánico los mas característico son la Cantera, Pulgahuasi y Ciceras. Resalta de entre todas la serpiente de quince metros de longitud toda esta en una piedra. Para llegar a estas es por camino de herradura.” (Condori Pacheco 2008: 31; my emphasis).

En enero de 2018 le pregunté a Luis Villegas si conocía este petroglifo de la serpiente de 15 m, pero me envió un correo electrónico diciéndome que no conocía el sitio, pero que intentaría localizarlo. En mayo de 2020, Luis Villegas me envió un correo electrónico diciéndome que había encontrado el sitio (posición marcada por el gran óvalo amarillo en la Figura 9). No solo me envió una hermosa foto (según las propiedades de la foto tomada en enero de 2009) de la roca con la supuesta serpiente de 15 m (que parece superponer dos petroglifos de aves, dos cuadrúpedos y un antropomorfo), sino que también reveló el ubicación exacta en Google Earth enviando un archive-KMZ (posición marcada por el pequeño círculo gris en la Figura 9). Además mencionó que en Cíceras registró una treintena de cantos rodados más con petroglifos y que el sitio fue atravesado por un antiguo sendero de 20 km de largo desde Huancarqui en el Valle de Majes hasta Cíceras (que es claramente visible en la Figura 9). La roca con la serpiente – etiquetada como Roca 1 por Luis Villegas – se encuentra a solo 15 m al sur y cuesta abajo de este antiguo camino.

Por supuesto, el camino se habrá utilizado en ambas direcciones. Sin embargo, me gustaría sugerir tentativamente que quizás los primeros exploradores vinieron de Cíceras. Dos hechos parecen confirmar mi cuidadosa hipótesis. En primer lugar, el panel (240 m de alto y 295 m de ancho) con el supuesto petroglifo de la serpiente de 15 m está orientado hacia el este y, por lo tanto, es claramente visible solo para los viajeros que vienen de Cíceras. En segundo lugar, y lo que es más importante, es que los viajeros procedentes de Cíceras se encontraron por primera vez con un gran geoglifo (registrado por SV Arqueólogos) en una cresta a unos 110 m SE del camino y en un nivel algo más bajo que el camino. Este geoglifo lineal (a partir de la posición de un punto marcado con “A” en la Figura 9) consiste en una “carretera” lineal de 330 m de largo, pero curvado (aproximadamente 7 m de ancho) que termina cerca las ruinas de algunas estructuras (marcadas con “D” en la Figura 9). Estoy convencido de que este geoglifo representa un camino simbólico, quizás de uso ritual. Este geoglifo-camino se aprecia mejor viniendo desde Cíceras. Inmediatamente a la derecha (norte) del geoglifo lineal hay dos grandes geoglifos de camélidos (posición marcada con “C” en la Figura 9; Figura 9-Derecha) que están mirando el geoglifo lineal. En varios puntos, el camino físico también muestra numerosos rastros de huellas de camélidos. Por tanto, es seguro que existe un vínculo entre el camino y los geoglifos. El camino termina en el pueblo de Huancarqui en el Valle de Majes, posiblemente en un lugar donde una vez se reportó al menos una roca con petroglifos del Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes.

Además, si se continúa hacia el oeste desde los geoglifos de camélidos a lo largo del camino físico serpenteante durante unos 1700 m se llega al sitio de arte rupestre de Cíceras, donde varios cantos rodados tienen petroglifos de camélidos, algunos de los cuales son casi idénticos en estilo y disposición a los dos geoglifos de camélidos. Entre las otras imágenes se encuentran los petroglifos de cuadrúpedos (zorros o perros), serpientes, pájaros (representados tanto frontal como lateralmente), el antropomorfo ocasional y un gran motivo solar con rasgos faciales que miran hacia el este. Varios petroglifos de aves representados frontalmente presentan un patrón de cuerpo esquelético, que puede compararse con un petroglifo en Culebrillas, un sitio de arte rupestre a unos 86 km de la ESE (Van Hoek 2016: Fig.22). Una roca con petroglifos también mostraba algunas pictografías rojas (al igual que el grande bloque de El Cubo). Finalmente, también es importante señalar que tanto los geoglifos biomórficos como los petroglifos de Cíceras pertenecen definitivamente al Estilo del Arte Rupestre de Majes.

Conclusiones

Este estudio definitivamente confirma que existe una relación firme entre el Arte Rupestre Estilo Majes y algunos de los complejos de geoglifos en el Área de Estudio. Sin embargo, parece que los geoglifos que muestran las imágenes del estilo de arte rupestre de Majes están confinados al área justo al oeste de la cuenca de Majes (Cosos) hasta la orilla oeste de la cuenca de Sihuas. La orilla este del Valle de Sihuas tiene, hasta donde yo sé, solo geoglifos abstractos. Sin embargo, justo al oeste del drenaje de Sihuas se han registrado muchos geoglifos circulares y algunos abstractos y biomórficos (Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes) (Yépez Alvarez, Jennings y Berquist 2017; Jennings et al.2021). Estos geoglifos circulares (y otros abstractos) también se encuentran más al este, en la cuenca de Vítor, pero son desconocidos para mí en la cuenca de Majes.

Los tres complejos de geoglifos discutidos en este estudio (Huacán, Cosos y Cíceras) muestran el Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes, pero hay una diferencia. Solo en el Geoglifo de Huacán se han registrado los típicos surcos serpentinos más “Stripe”. Lo que los tres sitios tienen en común es que todos están ubicados en antiguas rutas a través de la pampa. Es más, parece que todos los sitios de geoglifos están orientados de tal manera que son visibles para los viajeros que vienen de una sola dirección. Tentativamente me gustaría sugerir que los geoglifos de Cosos saludan a los caravaneros que viajan de Majes a Chuquibamba y/o Illomas, mientras que los geoglifos de Cíceras y la Roca 1 en Cíceras saludan al viajero desde Cíceras al Valle de Majes. Asimismo sugiero que el geoglifo de Huacán dé la bienvenida a los viajeros de Majes a Cabracancha. Por esa razón sugiero que esos tres complejos de geoglifos pueden incluso ser los primeros signos de exploración de posibles rutas hacia y desde el Valle de Majes.

Otra diferencia entre los tres complejos de geoglifos es, incluso cuando los tres muestran imágenes de uno o más camélidos, que solo el Geoglifo de Huacán presenta los elementos típicos de serpentina y “Stripe” del Estilo de Arte Rupestre de Majes (ignorando por el momento los ejemplos que se muestran en las Figuras 1 y 2 y otros geoglifos). Lo que une a estos tres complejos es la presencia de una o varias imágenes de camélidos. Lo más probable es que esto confirme la importancia de las caravanas de camélidos en toda la zona. Pero el Geoglifo de Huacán es, en mi opinión, el único que puede reflejar la topografía local. Sin embargo, el elemento de camino ancho en el Geoglifo de Cíceras bien puede representar un camino simbólico o ritual, ya que corre cuesta arriba y paralelo al camino antiguo por una gran distancia. Por tanto, también puede reflejar la topografía local. Las tres áreas deben ser estudiadas científicamente para ubicar más sitios de arte rupestre y geoglifos que puedan confirmar mis teorías.

Agradecimientos

El autor desea agradecer a Luis Villegas, arqueólogo de SV-Arqueólogos – Empresa Consultora en Arqueología (Lima, Perú) por enviarme una excelente fotografía de Roca 1 del sitio de petroglifos de Cíceras, también por enviarme el KMZ- archivo con las coordenadas exactas de Roca 1en Google Earth. El autor también agradece al profesor Johan Reinhard por su amable permiso para usar y publicar su fotografías (Figura 8).

*

References – Referencias

Alvarez Zeballos, P. J. n.d./ s.f. El Geoglífo de las Pampas del Ocho. Internet.

Condori Pacheco, J. 2008. Plan de Despegue Turístico Provincia de Castilla: 2008 – 2018. Castillo – Arequipa.

Jennings, J., M. van Hoek, W. Yépez Álvarez, S. Bautista, R. A. San Miguel Fernández and G. Spence-Morrow. 2019. Illomas: the three thousand year history of a rock art site in Southern Peru. Ñawpa Pacha, Journal of Andean Archaeology. Vol. 39-2; pp. 1 – 31.

Jennings, Justin, Willy Yépez Álvarez and Stefanie L. Bautista (Eds.). 2021. Quilcapampa: A Wari Enclave in Southern Peru. University of Florida Press.

Linares Málaga, E. 2013 (1981). Evaluación de recursos histórico-arqueológicos del Proyecto Majes y área de influencia. Sector Siguas-Huacán. In: Boletín de APAR. Vol. 5/17-18; pp. 761 – 777.

López Hurtado, M. A. and E. E. Maquera Sánchez. 2016. Geoglífos en Huayrapunko, Quebrada Cosos, Valle de Majes. Arqueología de la Macro Región Sur.indd. pp. 106 – 113.

Trujillo Vera, C. C. 2011. Asentamientos Prehispánicos en el Paisaje Geográfico de Huacán. In: Historia. Vol. 10; pp. 9 – 15. Universidad Nacional de San Agustín, Arequipa.

Van Hoek, M. 2003. The rock art of Toro Muerto, Peru. Rock Art Research. Vol. 20-2; pp. 151 – 170. Melbourne, Australia.

Van Hoek, M. 2005. Biomorphs ‘playing a wind instrument’ in Andean rock art. Rock Art Research. Vol. 22-1; pp. 23 – 34. Melbourne, Australia.

Van Hoek, M. 2013. A new (?) geoglyph in the Department of Arequipa, Peru. Un geoglifo nuevo (?) en el departamento de Arequipa, Peru. In: Rupestreweb.

Van Hoek, M. 2016. Sobre Dibujos de Arte Rupestre (Andino). Una Petición Para Sólo Publicar Dibujos Que Son Científicamente Sólidos. In: TRACCE – On-line Rock Art Bulletin, Italy.

Van Hoek, M. 2018. Formative Period Rock Art in Arequipa, Peru. An up-dated analysis of the rock art from Caravelí to Vítor. Oisterwijk, Holland. Book available at ResearchGate.

Van Hoek, M. 2019. The Incomplete Versus The Unfinished: Invisible Objects in Desert Andes Rock Art? In: TRACCE – On-line Rock Art Bulletin, Italy.

Van Hoek, M. 2020. New “Carcancha” Petroglyphs in Arequipa, Peru. Illustrating the “Road to Coropuna”. In: TRACCE – Online Rock Art Bulletin, Italy.

Van Hoek, M. 2021. The Enigma of the “Feathered Homunculus” in the Rock Art of the Majes Valley, Peru. In: TRACCE – Online Rock Art Bulletin, Italy.

Yépez Alvarez,  W. J., J. Jennings and S. Berquist. 2017. Patrón arquitectónico y uso del espacio durante el Horizonte Tardío en el valle de Siguas, Arequipa. Cuadernos del Qhapaq Ñan. Vol. 5-5; pp. 126 – 148.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

14 − six =